Prominent Casper businessman Tony Cercy recently denied allegations that he sexually assaulted a 20-year-old woman in 2017.

Cercy's denial comes in a Monday filing in US District Court for Wyoming. His denial comes after a woman last month filed a lawsuit claiming Cercy sexually assaulted her.

Cercy was acquitted of first- and second-degree sexual assault following a February 2018 jury trial. A mistrial was declared on a third count of third-degree sexual assault.

The next year, a jury issued a guilty verdict on third-degree sexual assault but following an appeal, the Wyoming Supreme Court threw out the verdict.

The civil complaint details similar allegations levied against Cercy in criminal court. The complaint alleges the following events occurred on June 25, 2017:

  • The woman was at a residence near Alcova Reservoir which Cercy formerly owned.
  • She laid down on the couch at Cercy's lake house fully clothed.
  • She woke up to Cercy sexually assaulting her after he clothes had been removed.
  • The woman attempted to flee Cercy's lake house but was not familiar with the area. At some point, Cercy pulled up to the woman and forced her in his side-by-side. Cercy then drove her to a friend's trailer where she believed her friends were staying. She reportedly described the drive to the trailer as frightening.
  • Cercy told the woman if she told anyone about the incident he would have her killed.

In the response, Cercy concedes that the woman was at his house at some point during the night of the allegations. He also states that the woman was intoxicated. For the rest of the response, Cercy either flatly denies the allegations or having knowledge of events that night.

For example, attorneys representing Cercy write, "Mr. Cercy does not know if (the woman) fell asleep or passed out," and "Mr. Cercy does not recall what (the woman) was wearing and, accordingly, lacks specific knowledge or information sufficient to form a belief about the truth of these allegations."

In the initial complaint, the woman states that she went to Wyoming Medical Center for a rape kit. In that case, Cercy admits to being aware the woman went to the hospital, though documents claim he "lacks any personal knowledge or information regarding the motive for going to the medical center."

"Any damages or injuries claimed by (the woman) were caused by her own negligent conduct and/or the conduct of third parties," the response states. The response goes on to cite Wyoming statute that purportedly bars Cercy from being held liable.

As for allegations not specifically addressed in response Cercy, "denies every allegation not specifically admitted above."

Calls to attorneys in the case were not immediately returned.