A CASPER MAN WAS CHARGED WITH FIVE SEX CRIMES AGAINST A 13-YEAR-OLD GIRL THREE YEARS AGO DURING HIS INITIAL APPEARANCE IN NATRONA COUNTY CIRCUIT COURT ON THURSDAY.

TWENTY-EIGHT-YEAR-OLD JAMES SANDERS WAS CHARGED WITH TWO COUNTS OF FIRST-DEGREE SEXUAL ASSAULT, OR RAPE, OF A MINOR, TWO COUNTS OF SECOND-DEGREE SEXUAL ABUSE OF A MINOR, AND ONE COUNT OF THIRD-DEGREE SEXUAL ABUSE OF A MINOR.

IF CONVICTED ON ALL COUNTS, HE FACES UP TO 155 YEARS IN PRISON.

CIRCUIT COURT JUDGE BRIAN CHRISTENSEN SET SANDERS BOND AT $100,000 CASH ONLY.

A POLICE AFFIDAVIT SAYS THE CASE BEGAN IN APRIL 2015 WHEN A MILLS POLICE OFFICER RESPONDED TO A RESIDENCE ABOUT AN ALLEGED SEXUAL ASSAULT.

SANDERS, WHOSE TWIN BROTHER KNEW THE FAMILY, WENT TO THE HOUSE WHERE THE GIRL AND HER TWO SISTER WERE.

THE ALLEGED VICTIM AND ONE SISTER WENT INTO THE BATHROOM, SANDERS ENTERED, TOLD ONE SISTER TO LEAVE, ASSAULTED THE GIRL AND TOLD HER HE WOULD KILL HER IF SHE TOLD ANYONE.

THE GIRL WAS TAKEN TO THE WYOMING MEDICAL CENTER FOR AN EXAM AND COLLECTION OF BIOLOGICAL EVIDENCE, WHICH W WAS SENT TO THE STATE CRIME LAB, AND DNA SAMPLES WERE COLLECTED FROM SANDERS AND HIS BROTHER.

LAST FRIDAY, MILLS POLICE RECEIVED THE REPORT FROM THE CRIME LAB THAT NOTED THE OVERWHELMING PROBABILITY THAT SANDERS COMMITTED THE ASSAULTS.

THE AFFIDAVIT DOES NOT EXPLAIN THE THREE-YEAR GAP BETWEEN THE TIME THE BIOLOGICAL EVIDENCE WAS SUBMITTED TO THE STATE CRIME LAB AND WHEN ITS REPORT WAS RECEIVED LAST FRIDAY.
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A WYOMING MAN COULD FACE DECADES BEHIND BARS IF CONVICTED OF THREE FELONY CHARGES STEMMING FROM A 2017 CRASH THAT KILLED A WOMAN AND TODDLER ON HIGHWAY 220 SOUTH OF CASPER.

33-YEAR-OLD ALEXANDER RICHARDSON OF LUSK, IS CHARGED WITH TWO COUNTS OF AGGRAVATED VEHICULAR HOMICIDE AND ONE COUNT OF AGGRAVATED ASSAULT. IF CONVICTED ON ALL THREE COUNTS, HE COULD FACE UP TO 50 YEARS IN PRISON.

RICHARDSON'S ATTORNEY, DON FULLER, TOLD K2 RADIO NEWS THAT RICHARDSON WAS DRIVING FROM HIS WORK SITE IN UTAH BACK TO HIS HOME IN LUSK ON THE AFTERNOON OF AUG. 23 WHEN HIS F-250 COLLIDED HEAD-ON WITH A FORD EXPLORER.

THE WYOMING HIGHWAY PATROL SAYS IN A CRASH REPORT THAT RICHARDSON FAILED TO MAINTAIN HIS LANE OF TRAVEL AND DRIFTED ACROSS THE CENTER LINE INTO THE EXPLORER'S LANE.

THE 46-YEAR-OLD DRIVER OF THE EXPLORER WAS KILLED IN THE INITIAL COLLISION. A THREE-YEAR-OLD BOY DIED OF HIS INJURIES AT THE SCENE. ONE PASSENGER IN THE EXPLORER SURVIVED AND WAS TAKEN BY LIFE FLIGHT TO WYOMING MEDICAL CENTER.

FIRST RESPONDERS PULLED RICHARDSON FROM HIS PICKUP TRUCK AND TOOK HIM TO WYOMING MEDICAL CENTER VIA AMBULANCE.

RICHARDSON VOLUNTARILY TURNED HIMSELF IN TO LAW ENFORCEMENT EARLIER THURSDAY. HIS BOND WAS SET AT $7,500 CASH-ONLY.
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THE CHEYENNE CITY COUNCIL ON MONDAY NIGHT APPROVED SPENDING UP TO $600,000 TO SUPPORT SAFE AND RELIABLE COMMERCIAL PASSENGER AIR SERVICE AT THE CHEYENNE REGIONAL AIRPORT.

CHEYENNE HAS BEEN WITHOUT AN AIR CARRIER SINCE LATE MARCH, WHEN GREAT LAKES AIRLINES ANNOUNCED IT WAS SHUTTING DOWN OPERATIONS.

"THE CONSEQUENCES OF NOT DOING SOMETHING IN PARTNERSHIP WITH THE STATE AND THE COUNTY AND THE JOINT POWERS BOARD AND CRAFT AND ALL OF THE STAKEHOLDERS THAT HAVE SOMETHING IN THE GAME, THE CONSEQUENCES OF THAT ARE GOING TO BE A VOTER APPROVED $18 MILLION AIRPORT TO NOWHERE OR WAREHOUSE."

COUNCILMAN ROCKY CASE SAYS THE $600,000 WILL BE COMBINED WITH COUNTY, STATE, FEDERAL AND PRIVATE MONEY TO FORM A "MINIMUM REVENUE GUARANTEE" TO HELP AN AIR CARRIER AVOID LOSING TOO MUCH MONEY SHOULD IT TAKE A CHANCE ON CHEYENNE.
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CASPER, WYO. (AP) - THE U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY HAS GIVEN THE UNIVERSITY OF WYOMING NEARLY $10 MILLION TO SEE IF 50 MILLION TONS (45 MILLION METRIC TONS) OF CARBON DIOXIDE CAN BE STORED UNDERGROUND NORTH OF GILLETTE.

THE CASPER STAR-TRIBUNE REPORTS THAT THE GREENHOUSE GAS POSES A LONG-TERM RISK TO WYOMING, WHICH IS THE LARGEST COAL-PRODUCING STATE. THE STUDY WILL SEE IF THE GAS CAN BE CAPTURED FROM COAL-BURNING PLANTS AND STORED UNDERGROUND.

ABOUT 40 PERCENT OF THE COAL BURNED IN U.S. POWER PLANTS COMES FROM WYOMING'S POWDER RIVER BASIN AND THE INDUSTRY IS A CRUCIAL PIECE OF THE STATE'S ECONOMY. HOWEVER, FROM CURRENT AND PENDING REGULATIONS ON CARBON DIOXIDE EMISSIONS TO CUSTOMER PREFERENCE FOR CLEANER ENERGY SOURCES IN OTHER PARTS OF THE COUNTRY, A HOST OF FACTORS THREATEN THE FUTURE USE OF WYOMING COAL.