Let's get this out of the way: The hole in the middle of the spaghetti spoon isn't there to help drain water out of your noodles.

Sure, it might help keep excess liquid out of your dish, but that couldn't be any farther from the actual purpose of the spoon's design.

Why There's A Hole In The Middle Of Spaghetti Spoons

The hole in the center of the spoon is actually a tool to measure pasta. Food Network says to use it "to measure out a perfect single serving of spaghetti."

If you're like me, you often cook WAAAAY more spaghetti than what is needed for the sauce. Using the spoon's hole the measure will give you a more consistent amount of noodles for your dish.

Today.com's instructions say to "place a handful of dried spaghetti through it to measure a portion for one diner and add more as needed, depending on how many people you're cooking for."

Canva
Canva
loading...

You're Not Alone If You Didn't Know This

Pasta spoon makers might want to do a better job explaining the pasta measurement tool. Both Food Network and Today found several viewers who had no idea the hole had a purpose other than draining water.

"And I thought it was to drain the said spaghetti," a Today viewer commented on Facebook. "How could I have been so wrong all these years. I'm going back to bed. My day has been upset."

READ MORE: You Can Buy Olive Garden's Cheese Grater And People Are Freaking Out

You also might not have known this depending on the design of your spoon. A report shared by U.K.-based Metro was quick to note some pasta spoons lack holes or have much smaller holes than the suggested serving size.

"Sorry to have burst your pasta-filled bubble," the website said.

Most popular grocery stores in America

The most popular grocery stores in America, from corporate chains to family-owned enterprises. Stacker ranked them using consumer ratings sourced from YouGov polls.

Gallery Credit: Stacker

LOOK: 50 Beloved Retail Chains That No Longer Exist

Stacker takes a look at 50 major retail chains that no longer exist and the reasons for their demise.  

Gallery Credit: Madison Troyer

 

 

More From K2 Radio